Welcome to the Gallery for
Minerals from Pakistan and Afghanistan!



The pictures in this site are taken by The Crystall-Pocket from minerals from our own collection or from private collections from friends and family and are displayed with permission. Copyright for all pictures by The Crystall-Pocket 2006 - 2007!

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The pictures can be used free of charge for private and educational purposes as long as you  mention the source.  For any other use, publication, or distribution in any form (print, film, digital or any other media) a written permission is required!


Links to other Rooms in our Virtual Mineral Museum:

Tourmaline Room - Garnet Room - Quartz Room
 
Topaz Room - Spodumen Room - Fine Minerals Room
 
Alpine Room - Namibia Room - Pakistan/Afghanistan Room



Multicolor Elbaite, AfghanistanFine Tourmaline Specimen, ~ 4.5 inches tall, 
pastell-like tones from Nuristan in Afghanistan.


 
Almandine/Spesartine from PakistanAlmandine Garnet (~2cm) that we acquired in the early 90ies as Almandine from Pakistan. However, we analyzed of few (other) specimen from Pakistan and very often found that these garnets are mixtures of Almandine and Spessartine (which can also mix with Pyrope - PyrAlSpit-series). The individual components are often presen in almost the same ratio making it hard to tell whether this is an Almandine or a Spessartine.



Elbait Stak NalaStak Nala in Pakistan is well known for its multicolored Elbait.
The piece on the left is ~ 3 cm long and is surounde by white leafes of Clevelandite. 



Hessonite Shigar, PakistanFeldspar with Spessartine and Schörl
These are two pieces from Shengus, Shigar in Pakistan. The one on the left is an outstanding Hessonite crystal (~ 3cm) and on the left is a floater Feldspar, which has a very shiny front face with separation of different feldspar vaireties.  It is covered with small Spessartines and there is also a small Schorl  (~ 3cm) in the front.

     
Morganite from AfghanistanMorganite, a pink Beryll, from Afghanistan.


 
Kunzite with ClevelanditKunzite, the lilac variety of spodumen, with Clevelandit (variety of Feldspar)  from Afghanistan, find of 2004
Obtained from www.jrmineral.com


        
Aquamarine AfghanistanAquamarine (~ 5 cm) on Feldspar from Afghanistan. A very clear Aqua - you can see through the crystal down to the bottom of the crystal´s base!
Obtained from www.jrmineral.com



Schorl with Aquamarine, PakistanSchorl with Fluorite, Pakistan
Schorl is a black tourmaline colored by iron. It is relatively common and can be found in many pegmetites. Nevertheless, it can form really fascinating crystals and very interesting combos with other minerals, such as the two pieces depicted here. On the left one can see a Schorl with Aquamarine (Beryll), on the right we show a Schorl with Fluorite in fine-bladed Clevelandite, a very esthetic specimen in our opinon. Both specimen are from Pakistan, a rich source of beautiful Schorl combos


 
Tricolor Elbait, PakistanTricolored Elbaite, from Giligt, Pakistan, ~ 2 cm in length.
Obtained from www.jrmineral.com



Bent Tourmaline, Pabrok, AfghanistanBent pink tourmaline from Pabrol, Afghanistan. A very interesting doubly terminated piece: first, it has a clear cap on the otherwise gemmy pink crystal, second, the smaller attachted crystal is heavily bent. How can this happen? Well, the crystals as we know them are solid - but they are not when they are formed under great heat and pressure. Under these conditions  a crystal can be bend, e.g. by geological events. Often this leads to fractured in the crystal which can be filled with tourmaline or other minerals, such as feldspar, again. This in turn leads to striations, which are often seen for example in Himalaya specimen as white "bands" in the crystal.


 
Tricolor Tourmaline, PabrokTricolored Tourmaline from Pabrok, Afghanistan.
Very nice green-2-blue-2-clear specimen.

 
Topaz from HaramoshNew find from 2006: Topaz with Sherry-colored body and colorless top and base, with Clevelandit; Sissi (Sassi), Haramosh, Pakistan.
Obtained from www.jrmineral.com



Fadenquartz, Wana Waziristan, PakistanFadenquartz from Wana Waziristan, Pakistan. Faden is the German word for a string. In these quartzes one can see a white string (Faden) in the middle of the crystal with the individual quartz crystals growing perpendicular to the Faden. In the present case the indivisual crystals also spiral along the axis of the faden. Such spiraled or twisted specimen are called a "Gwindel".

 
Hessonite, Afghanistan Hessonite from Afghanistan.


  
Garnet on Feldspar with Quartz, PakistanCombo of a Garnet with Quartz, Feldspar, and Schörl (on the backside) from Pakistan. If you wonder why we just say a garnet withouth further specification - here is the answer. Garnets from Pakistan can be either Almandine, Spessartine (typically from Haramosh or K2 region) or Grossular (from Parachinar). Unfortunately, Almandine and Spessartine can form chemical mixutres with each other, but not with Grossular. This garnet here is either Almandine or Spessartine, depending which of the two minerals dominates in the mixture. In principle each garnet has to be analyzed for its chemical composition to exactly tell which variety one looks at. As this one has not been analyzed in detail, we simply call it - garnet.


 
Spessartine on Schorl, PakistanSpessartine is very beautiful when accompanied by the constrasting Schörl. This one is from Pakistan.
Obtained from www.jrmineral.com



Spessartine, AfghanistanHere is an very esthetic swimmer of Quartz and Feldspar covered with Spessartine from Afghanistan.


      
Please visit us again - we will add more rooms to our gallery ....
     
Links to other Rooms in our Virtual Mineral Museum:

Tourmaline Room - Garnet Room - Quartz Room
 
Topaz Room - Spodumen Room - Fine Minerals Room
 
Alpine Room - Namibia Room - Pakistan/Afghanistan Room