Welcome to the
Alpine Minerals Gallery!



The pictures in this site are taken by The Crystall-Pocket from minerals from our own collection or from private collections from friends and family and are displayed with permission. Copyright for all pictures by The Crystall-Pocket 2006 - 2007!

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The pictures can be used free of charge for private and educational purposes as long as you  mention the source.  For any other use, publication, or distribution in any form (print, film, digital or any other media) a written permission is required!


Links to other Rooms in our Virtual Mineral Museum:

Tourmaline Room - Garnet Room - Quartz Room
 
Topaz Room - Spodumen Room - Fine Minerals Room
 
Alpine Room - Namibia Room - Pakistan/Afghanistan Room



Szepter Amethyst from Moerchnerkaar, Zillertal, TyrolThe Zillertal is very well known for its Szepter- and Window-Amthyst and its Hematit-roses (Eisenrosen), which can be found in the Mörchnerkaar and the Saurüssel. The Amthyst quite frequently do not have the most intense violett colors, but they impress more by their shape. Here we show a Sezepter of about 5 cm hight. In fact, it appears that there was first a nomal Quarz, which was then overgrown by a doubly terminated pale Amethyst. What makes this specimen special are the fine hairs of Rutil and two blades of Brookite, which can be seen in the upper part of the crystal.


Almandine from Hornkees, Zillertal, TyrolAlamdin in schist, Berliner Spitz, Tyrol
The Zillertal in Tyrol (Austria) is famous for its Almandine garnets, which have long been mined both as cutting rough as well as grinding material.
The crystals usually do not grow to the size of those found in the Ötztal, but can reach several centimeters. The one on the left is a typical example from the Hornkees. I have been collecting there myself and believe me: the real challenge is to clean the specimen up and remove the schist around the garnets. Crystals are up to ~ 2 cm here. The right one was found also in the Zillertal, on the Berliner Spitze. It ahs a particularly shiny red and is 35 mm in diameter



Eisenrose (Hematit) on Adularia, Zillertal Iron-rose (Eisenrose, Hematit, ~1.5 cm) grown on a crystal of Adularia (~4 cm).
Self collected at the Mörchner-Kar in Zillertal, Tyrol in the mid 1990ies.
 


Epidot, Knappenwand, Salzburg
Epidote from the Knappenwand in Salzburg, which is certainly one of the most important sites for this mineral (crystal is ~4 cm high).
Obtained from www.irocks.com, (from the former Wein Collection).

The Knappenwand was discovered in 1865 as a major source of Epidote. For a long time it has been mined by the Natural History Museum of Vienna for scientific purposes. Recently, the old mine has been re-activated and restored as a show mine, which can be visted during the summer month. More information here.



Almandine, Zillertal, TyrolAlmandine "Stalaktite" with elongated Almandine Crystals
from the Zillertal, Tyrol, Austria.

Almandines in the Zillertal formed as a metamorphic mineral: when the host rock was pulled down into the earth it heated up and was put under pressure. The rock did not melt, but some of its constituents became instable and set free certain chemical elementd. These diffused through the solid rock and formed the Almandine garnets. Because it is known the Almandine requires a certain temperature for its growth it can be used as kind of a geo-thermometer.  The Zillertal is very famous for its garnets: they have been mined here for several hunderet years, in part for jewellery and in part as grinding materaial, due its hardness.


      
Please visit us again - we will add more rooms to our gallery ....
      
Links to other Rooms in our Virtual Mineral Museum:

Tourmaline Room - Garnet Room - Quartz Room
 
Topaz Room - Spodumen Room - Fine Minerals Room
 
Alpine Room - Namibia Room - Pakistan/Afghanistan Room